“With this growing number of universities in the country, it is disconcerting that no Nigerian University makes the list of the best 1,000 Universities in the world. With depletion off old infrastructures, absence of necessary infrastructures, protracted strike actions by lecturers over salaries and welfare issues, depleting standards, brain drain, etc, Nigerian Universities are multiplying without producing output”

The number of private universities in Nigeria significantly increased last week by 20. This was as the Federal Executive Council (FEC), presided over by President Muhammadu Buhari, last Wednesday, approved a new set of universities after they passed standard qualification tests of the National Universities Commission (NUC). That brought to a total of 99 private universities in the country.
The names of the newly approved private universities include Topfaith University, Mkpatak, Akwa Ibom State; Thomas Adewumi University, Oko-Irese, Kwara State; Maranathan University, Mgbidi, Imo State; Ave Maria University, Piyanko, Nasarawa State; Al-Istiqama University, Sumaila, Kano State; Mudiame University, Irrua, Edo State; Havilla University, Nde-Ikom, Cross River State; Claretian University of Nigeria, Nekede, Imo State; NOK University, Kachia, Kaduna State and Karl-Kumm University, Vom, Plateau State.

Others are James Hope University, Lagos, Lagos State; Maryam Abacha American University of Nigeria, Kano, Kano State; Capital City University, Kano, Kano State; Ahman Pategi University, Pategi, Kwara State; University of Offa, Offa, Kwara State; Mewar University, Masaka, Nasarawa State; Edusoko University, Bida, Niger State; Philomath University, Kuje, Abuja; Khadija University, Majia, Jigawa State and Anan University, Kwall, Plateau State.
According to the Minister of Education, Adamu Adamu, who briefed newsmen after the FEC meeting, the approved universities would be given provisional licenses from the National Universities Commission (NUC), to run for three years while the ministry would monitor the progress.
Records show that before the last FEC approval, there were private universities in the country stood at 79, federal universities remain 43 while state government-owned universities are 48 thus bringing a total of all Universities in Nigeria to 190.
With the number of students being churned out of secondary schools in the country, students compete for admission annually.

With this growing number of universities in the country, it is disconcerting that no Nigerian University makes the list of the best 1,000 Universities in the world. With depletion off old infrastructures, absence of necessary infrastructures, protracted strike actions by lecturers over salaries and welfare issues, depleting standards, brain drain, etc, Nigerian Universities are multiplying without producing output.

It is true that some of the Nigerian students, graduates and academics have made and have continued to have impressive performances at international stages; however, that should not be taken as a yardstick to compare standards, availability or provision of befitting facilities required to enhance learning between students in Nigeria and the ones in other climes where standards are never compromised.
While we understand that the country still needs even more universities to take more students, we are of the view that emphasis should be placed on standards and quality. We cannot continue to establish universities that cannot produce a qualified workforce, truly educated citizens well-equipped to salvage this country from its myriad of problems. Nigerian Pilot

LEAVE A REPLY